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Marshall County does not have an all clear sounder in event of a tornado

Marshall County Emergency Management Director Bill Schwindamann, Jr. would like to remind residents of Marshall County that in the event of a tornado, as was the case last week, that when the tornado siren sounds, it will continue to sound until the threat of severe weather has passed, however there will not be an “all-clear” siren. There was some confusion last week as the sirens continued to sound, that some folks thought that meant the all clear was being given. The sirens will go off whenever the National Weather Service issues a tornado warning or if a trained weather spotter visually confirms a funnel cloud. The sirens may also be sounded in the event of large hail or very strong winds of 60 mph or more. If the tornado sirens sound off several times in a row, that means life threatening danger exists and you need to remain in your shelters. The sirens are designed for outdoor warnings because they can’t always be heard when you’re in your house where having the air conditioner on or other noises make it difficult to hear them. Schwindamann says you need to rely on your radio, television, weather radio, or cell phone for warnings when you’re inside your home.

About Kevin Rippe

Kevin Rippe was born in Marysville and moved to Smith Center at the age of 1, then graduated from Smith Center High School in 1995. He graduated from Cloud County Community College in 1997, and joined the staff of KKAN/KQMA radio in Phillipsburg a year later. Since June of 2011 Kevin has been with us here at Your Country KNDY. You can hear Kevin on daily news reports, as well as calling area high school football and basketball. Kevin lives in Marysville with his wife Melissa, and 4 children Brennen, Jacob, Bailee, and Joshua.