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KDHE Says Check for CO2 Presence

We’ve had some chilling hints of it, but soon “cold” will be the operative word in most weather forecasts. With that in mind, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment is reminding Kansans about the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, gas that is extremely poisonous and can kill in minutes.

Carbon Monoxide is found in combustion fumes, such as those made by cars and trucks, portable generators, stoves, gas ranges and heating systems. CO2 fumes can build up in places that do not have a good flow of fresh air.

KDHE offers the following tips to help you protect your family from CO2 poisoning.
• Make sure heating appliances are in good working order and used only in well-ventilated areas.
• Don’t run a car engine in the garage, even to warm it up: move the car outside first.
• Never use a stove for heating.
• Have all gas, oil or coal burning appliances inspected by a technician every year to ensure they’re working correctly and are properly ventilated.

Anyone who suspects symptoms of CO2 poisoning should go outside and seek fresh air immediately. If a person has collapsed or is not breathing, call 911 for emergency medical assistance immediately from a safe location.

For more information and tips about CO2, you can call the KDHE Bureau of Environmental Health. That number is Area Code 785-296-5606.

About Mike Schrant

Mike is one of those guys who has spent nearly a lifetime trying to figure out what he wants to do when he grows up. He has split time as a broadcaster and educator having first worked in radio in the early 1970’s while attending junior college. The two careers are directly connected because many of the 25 years as an educator were spent teaching broadcast journalism at the high school and college levels. Mike is married and has three adult children (no grandchildren yet) and enjoys sports, debating politics, gardening, landscaping-hauling rocks, and swapping stories with the "good old boys".